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  • Lexington

    Lexington Man and Semiconductor Company Indicted for Theft of Trade Secrets

  • Commerce

    Commerce Launches New 232 Exclusions Portal

  • Morris

    Morris County Woman Admits Conspiring With Iranian National To Illegally Export Aircraft Components To Iran

  • Two

    Two Indictments Unsealed Charging Iranian Citizen with Violating U.S. Export Laws and Sanctions Against Iran

  • Cuba:

    Cuba: Restricting the Temporary Sojourn of Aircraft and Vessels

  • Registration

    Registration is Open for the BIS 2019 Annual Conference on Export Controls July 9-11, 2019 Washington, D.C.

  • Revisions

    Revisions to Country Group Designations for Venezuela and Conforming Changes for License Requirements.

  • Implementation

    Implementation of Certain New Controls on Emerging Technologies Agreed at Wassenaar Arrangement 2018 Plenary.

  • Middlesex

    Middlesex County Man Admits Participation in Conspiracy to Illegally Export Firearms and Other Items to Ukraine

  • Temporary

    Temporary General License final rule, effective May 20, 2019.

  • Addition

    Addition of Certain Entities to the Entity List (final rule), effective May 16, 2019.

  • Addition

    Addition of Certain Entities to the Entity List, Revision of an Entry on the Entity List and Removal of an Entity from the Entity List (final rule) 5/14/19 (84 FR 21233)

  • Registration

    Registration is Open for the BIS 2019 Annual Conference on Export Controls July 9-11, 2019 Washington, D.C.

  • BIS

    BIS adds 50 persons to Unverified List

  • Australian

    Australian National Sentenced to Prison Term For Exporting Electronics to Iran

  • Estonian

    Estonian National Extradited From Estonia To Face Charges Of Illegal Procurement Of U.S. Electronic

  • Staten

    Staten Island Attorney Pleads Guilty to Fraud and Extortion Scheme

  • The

    The Bureau of Industry and Security Presents BIS 2019 Annual Conference on Export Controls July 9-11, 2019 Washington, D.C.

  • Notice

    Notice of Request for Public Comments on Section 232 National Security Investigation of Imports of Titanium Sponge

  • Chinese

    Chinese Telecommunications Conglomerate Huawei and Huawei CFO Wanzhou Meng Charged with Financial Fraud

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Events

July 9-11, Washington, D.C.

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July 9-11   Washington, D.C.

BIS 2019 Update Conference on Export Controls and Policy 

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July 24-25, 2019, St. Louis, MO

St louis_MOJuly 24-25 St. Louis, MO Complying with U.S. Export Controls

 

This two-day program is led by BIS's professional counseling staff and provides an in-depth examination of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). The program will cover the information exporters need to know to comply with U.S. export control requirements on commercial goods, and other items subject to the EAR. We will focus on what items and activities are subject to the EAR, how to determine your export control classification number (ECCN), steps to take to determine the export licensing requirements for your item, when you can export or reexport without applying for a license, export clearance procedures, and record keeping requirements.

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August 20-21, 2019 Cincinnati, OH

Cincinatti4 resizedAugust 21-22, 2019 Cincinnati, OH

Complying with U.S. Export Controls

This The two-day program is led by BIS's professional counseling staff and provides an in-depth examination of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).  The program will cover the information exporters need to know to comply with U.S. export control requirements on commercial goods, and other items subject to the EAR.  We will focus on what items and activities are subject to the EAR; how to determine your export control classification number (ECCN); steps to take to determine the export licensing requirements for your item; when you can export or reexport without applying for a license; export clearance procedures and record keeping requirements; and guidance in applying this information.  Presenters will conduct a number of "hands-on" exercises that will prepare you to apply the regulations to your own company's export activities.  This program is well suited for those who need a comprehensive understanding of their obligations under the EAR.

 

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September 18-19, 2019 Los Angeles, CA

losangelesSeptember 18-19, 2019 Los Angeles, CA

Complying with U.S. Export Controls

This two-day program is led by BIS's professional counseling staff and provides an in-depth examination of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). The program will cover the information exporters need to know to comply with U.S. export control requirements on commercial goods. We will focus on what items and activities are subject to the EAR; steps to take to determine the export licensing requirements for your item; how to determine your export control classification number (ECCN); when you can export or reexport without applying for a license; export clearance procedures and record keeping requirements; Export Management Compliance Program (EMCP) concepts; and real life examples in applying this information. Presenters will conduct a number of "hands-on" exercises that will prepare you to apply the regulations to your own company's export activities. This one-of-a-kind program is well suited for those who need a comprehensive understanding of their obligations under the EAR.

 

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U.S. Department of Justice For Immediate Release: May 6, 2013
United States Attorney's Office Contact -- BIS Public Affairs: 202-482-2721

TAIWANESE FATHER AND SON ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY VIOLATING US LAWS TO PREVENT PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

CHICAGO -- A resident of Taiwan who the U.S. government has linked to the supply of weapons machinery to North Korea and his son, who resides in suburban Chicago, are facing federal charges here for allegedly conspiring to violate U.S. laws designed to thwart the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, federal law enforcement officials announced today. HSIEN TAI TSAI, also known as Alex Tsai, who is believed to reside in Taiwan, was arrested last Wednesday in Tallinn, Estonia, while his son, YUEH-HSUN Tsai, also known as Gary Tsai, who is from Taiwan and is a legal permanent resident in the U.S., was arrested the same day at his home in Glenview, Ill.

Gary Tsai, 36, was ordered held in custody pending a detention hearing at 1:30 p.m. today before Magistrate Judge Susan Cox in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Alex Tsai, 67, remains in custody in Estonia pending proceedings to extradite him to the United States.

Both men were charged in Federal Court in Chicago with three identical offenses in separate complaints that were filed previously and unsealed following their arrests. Each was charged with one count of conspiring to defraud the United States in its enforcement of laws and regulations prohibiting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, one count of conspiracy 2 to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) by conspiring to evade the restrictions imposed on Alex Tsai and two of his companies by the U.S. Treasury Department, and one count of money laundering.

The arrests and charges were announced by Gary S. Shapiro, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Cory B. Nelson, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Gary Hartwig, Special Agent-in-Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Chicago; and Ronald B. Orzel, Special Agent-in-Charge of the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Office of Export Enforcement, Chicago Field Office. The Justice Departmentfs National Security Division and Office of International Affairs assisted with the investigation. U.S. officials thanked the Estonian Internal Security Service and the Estonian Prosecutorfs Office for their cooperation.

According to both complaint affidavits, agents have been investigating Alex and Gary Tsai, as well as Individual A (a Taiwanese associate of Alex Tsai), and a network of companies engaged in the export of U.S. origin goods and machinery that could be used to produce weapons of mass destruction. Alex and Gary Tsai and Individual A are associated with at least three companies based in Taiwan . Global Interface Company, Inc., Trans Merits Co., Ltd., and Trans Multi Mechanics Co., Ltd. . that have purchased and then exported, and attempted to purchase and then export, from the United States machinery used to fabricate metals and other materials with a high degree of precision.

On Jan. 16, 2009, under Executive Order 13382, which sanctions proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters, the Treasury Departmentfs Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated Alex Tsai, Global Interface, and Trans Merits as proliferators 3 of weapons of mass destruction, isolating them from the U.S. financial and commercial systems and prohibiting any person or company in the United States from knowingly engaging in any transaction or dealing with Alex Tsai and the two Taiwanese companies.

In announcing the January 2009 OFAC order, the Treasury Department said that Alex Tsai was designated for providing, or attempting to provide, financial, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of the Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID), which was designated as a proliferator by President George W. Bush in June 2005. The Treasury Department asserted that Alex Tsai ghas been supplying goods with weapons production capabilities to KOMID and its subordinates since the late 1990s, and he has been involved in shipping items to North Korea that could be used to support North Koreafs advanced weapons program.h The Treasury Department further said that Global Interface was designated gfor being owned or controlled by Tsai,h who is a shareholder of the company and acts as its president. Tsai is also the general manager of Trans Merits Co. Ltd., which was designated for being a subsidiary owned or controlled by Global Interface Company Inc. http://www.treasury.gov/press]center/press]releases/Pages/hp1359.aspx

After the OFAC designations, Alex and Gary Tsai and Individual A allegedly continued to conduct business together, but attempted to hide Alex Tsaifs and Trans Meritfs involvement in those transactions by conducting business under different company names, including Trans Multi Mechanics. For example, by August 2009 . approximately 8 months after the OFAC designations . Alex and Gary Tsai, Individual A and others allegedly began using Trans Multi Mechanics to purchase and export machinery on behalf of Trans Merits and Alex Tsai. Specifically, the charges allege that in September 2009 they purchased a Bryant center hole 4 grinder from a U.S. company based in suburban Chicago, and exported it to Taiwan using the company Trans Multi Mechanics. A Bryant center hole grinder is a machine tool used to grind a center hole, with precisely smooth sides, through the length of a material.

The charges further allege that by at least September 2009, Gary Tsai had formed a machine tool company named Factory Direct Machine Tools, in Glenview, Ill., which was in the business of importing and exporting machine tools, parts, and other items to and from the United States. However, the charges allege that Alex Tsai and Trans Merits were active partners in Factory Direct Machine Tools, in some instances procuring the goods for import to the United States for Factory Direct Machine Tool customers.

Violating IEEPA carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine; money laundering carries a maximum of 20 years in prison and a $500,000 fine; and conspiracy to defraud the United States carries a maximum of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. If convicted, the Court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines. The government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Patrick Pope and Brian Hayes.

The public is reminded that a complaint is not evidence of guilt. The defendants are presumed innocent and are entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

   
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